Health Catalyst Recommends

Knowledge Center - Recently Added

Short on time? We've picked the best content for you to start with.

HealthCatalyst Recommends

Five Lessons for Building Adaptive Healthcare Data Models that Support Innovation

Healthcare data models are the backbone of innovation in healthcare, without which many new technologies may never come to fruition, so it’s important to build models that focus on relevant content and specific use cases.

Health Catalyst has been continuously refining its approach to building concise yet adaptive healthcare data models for years. Because of our experience, we’ve learned five key lessons when it comes to building healthcare data models:

  1. Focus on relevant content.
  2. Externally validate the model.
  3. Commit to providing vital documentation.
  4. Prioritize long-term planning.
  5. Automate data profiling.

These lessons are essential to apply when building adaptive healthcare data models (and their corresponding methodologies, tools, and best practices) given the prominent role they play in fueling the technologies designed to solve healthcare’s toughest problems.

Read More
My Folder

Four Effective Opioid Interventions for Healthcare Leaders

The crisis of opioid abuse in the U.S. is well known. What may not be so well known are the ways for clinicians and healthcare systems to minimize misuse of these addictive drugs. This article describes the risks for patients when they are prescribed opioids and the need for opioid intervention. It offers four approaches that healthcare systems can take to tackle the crisis while still relieving pain and suffering for the patients they serve:

  1. Use data and analytics to inform strategies that reduce opioid availability
  2. Adopt prescription drug monitoring programs to prevent misuse
  3. Adopt evidence-based guidelines
  4. Consider promising state strategies for dealing with prescription opioid overdose

Opioid misuse is a public health epidemic, but treatments are available and it’s time for those involved in the delivery of healthcare to change practices.

Read More
My Folder

The Cost of Healthcare: A Revisionist History (HAS17)

Robert A. DeMichiei, Executive Vice President and Chief Financial Officer, UPMC

 

The healthcare industry has long relied on volume, revenue, and commercial payers to sustain operations and fund our community and academic missions. With a rapidly changing landscape, reducing cost and delivering value to patients and payers is critical to survival. In this session, Rob DeMichiei, executive vice president and chief financial officer, UPMC, will challenge traditional thinking around cost, clinical variation, and how we measure efficiency. Without a reliable way to measure your costs and productivity at a patient and physician level, how can you ever expect to identify opportunities for improvement? Rob will provide an introduction to activity-based costing, how it works, and how it is used by UPMC to drive cost productivity, identify clinical variation, measure service line performance, and link cost and quality.

Read More
My Folder

Activity-Based Costing and Clinical Service Lines Team up to Improve Financial and Clinical Outcomes

Healthcare costs continue to increase at a disproportionate rate relative to gross domestic product, and Americans are becoming increasingly aware that they aren’t getting their money’s worth. To build a sustainable healthcare system, healthcare organizations must identify and address waste and reduce the total cost of care.

UPMC recognized that the common denominator to addressing threats to sustainability is to fully understand and effectively manage costs. It implemented activity-based costing (ABC), facilitated by the Health Catalyst CORUS™ Suite, to deliver detailed and actionable cost data across the analytics environment, and support service line reporting, contract modeling, and clinical process improvement. UPMC has used this approach to effectively drive cost savings and improve clinical outcomes in many of its service lines, including Surgical Services, Women’s Health, Orthopedics, and Cardiovascular. For example:

  • $3M cost savings/avoidance over 2 years through the implementation of the ERAS program.
  • Increased insight into cost variation and drivers of inefficiency in the operating room setting.
  • Improved patient outcomes and quality (readmissions, complications, patient reported outcomes, patient satisfaction, etc.) for patients undergoing joint replacement.
Read More
My Folder

Application of Analytics to DNFB Improvement Effort Continues to Deliver Impressive Results

Financial challenges rank as the number one issue hospitals face, and hospital CEOs are always looking for opportunities to boost revenue through improved reimbursement. Managing discharged not final billed (DNFB) cases, where bills remain incomplete due to coding or documentation gaps, is one important way hospitals can improve financial performance. However, without analytics to support efforts, meeting a target for DNFB improvement remains a serious challenge.

Thibodaux Regional Medical Center, a 180-bed community hospital in Louisiana, invested in analytics and resources to improve their DNFB rates. By expanding the use of analytics to every aspect of the work, the hospital transformed financial improvement efforts with impressive results.

While some organizations struggle to sustain hard-won financial improvements, two years after Thibodaux Regional launched its initial DNFB improvement effort, it has sustained the initial outcomes, and further reduced AR days by 27.5 percent, while achieving these additional improvements:

  • $1 million in additional annual reimbursement, attributable to improvements in the accuracy of clinical documentation and CMI.
  • 66.7 percent relative reduction in DNFB dollars, significantly improving cash flow.
Read More
My Folder