Is Your Care Management Program Working: A Guide to ROI Challenges and Solutions (Executive Report)

Care management programs play a large part in many health systems’ population health strategies. However, these programs can consume a lot of resources. It is important to know if a care program is effective, and eventually, to show a positive ROI. Many roadblocks stand in the way:

  • Complexity of Environment
  • Prolonged Time to ROI
  • Lack of Access to Disparate Data
  • Difficulty Engaging the Patient

A thoughtful approach and a robust analytics platform can help organizations overcome these challenges. Care management ROI should be a long-term strategy, but cost savings and quick wins are possible using the Health Catalyst® Cost Management Suite.

How to Use Data to Improve Patient Safety (Executive Report)

Healthcare organizations have worked hard to improve patient safety over the past several decades, however harm is still occurring at an unacceptable rate. Though the healthcare industry has made efforts (largely regulatory) to reduce patient harm, these measures are often not integrated with health system quality improvement efforts and may not result in fewer adverse events. This is largely because they fail to integrate regulatory data with improvement initiatives and, thus, to turn patient harm information into actionable insight.

Fully integrated clinical, cost, and operational data coupled with predictive analytics and machine learning are crucial to patient safety improvement. Tools that leverage this methodology will identify risk and suggest interventions across the continuum of care.

A Guide to Care Management: Five Competencies Every Health System Must Have (Executive Report)

The goal and responsibility of every healthcare organization and provider using a care management approach is to deliver the right care at the right time to the right patients. This standard of care management can only be achieved if five competencies are in place:

  • Data Integration
  • Patient Stratification and Intake
  • Care Coordination
  • Patient Engagement
  • Performance Measurement

This guide to care management reviews each competency and shows how to put it all together into an effective program that gets results for organizations and patients alike.

Outcomes Improvement Governance: A Handbook for Success and Achieving More with Less (Executive Report)

For healthcare organizations looking to achieve outcomes improvement goals, effective governance is the most essential must-have. This leadership culture ensures success by enabling health systems to invest in outcomes improvement and allocate resources appropriately toward these goals.

This executive report is an outcomes improvement governance handbook centered on four guiding principles (and associated helpful steps) health systems can follow to achieve effective governance and start achieving more with less:

  1. Stakeholder engagement
  2. Shared understanding
  3. Alignment
  4. Focus

With these four principles, organizations can build a foundation of engagement and focus around the work, where they maximize strengths, and discover and address weaknesses. They establish an improvement methodology, define their goals, and sustain and standardize improvement work.

Preparing for MACRA: A Comprehensive FAQ for Physicians (Executive Report)

The Medicare Access and CHIP Reauthorization Act (MACRA) overhauls the payment system for Medicare providers. It’s a complex program that requires careful study so physicians can make the best choice for how they want to report. This choice ultimately impacts reimbursement and the potential bonuses or penalties associated with each reporting option.

This FAQ covers both tracks of the new rule, the Merit-based Incentive Payment System (MIPS), and the Advanced Alternative Payment Model (APM), with a background review and a comprehensive list of questions and answers.

It’s a practical guide complete with next steps for strategic and tactical planning.

The Best Way to Maximize Healthcare Analytics ROI (White Paper)

When it comes to maximizing analytics ROI in a healthcare organization, the more domains, the merrier. Texas Children’s Hospital started their outcomes improvement journey by using an EDW and analytics to improve a single process of care. It quickly realized the potential for more savings and improvement by applying analytics to additional domains, including:

  • Analytics efficiencies
  • Operations/Finance
  • Organization-wide clinical improvement

The competencies required to launch and sustain such an organizational sea change are all part of a single, defining characteristic: the data-driven culture. This allows fulfillment of the analytics strategy, ensures data quality and governance, encourages data and analytics literacy, standardizes data definitions, and opens access to data from multiple sources.

This article highlights the specifics of how Texas Children’s has evolved into an outcomes improvement leader, with stories about its successes in multiple domains.

Hadoop in Healthcare: Getting More from Analytics (White Paper)

Healthcare data is positioned for momentous growth as it approaches the parameters of big data. While more data can translate into more informed medical decisions, our ability to leverage this mounting knowledge is only as strong as our data strategy. Hadoop offers the capacity and versatility to meet growing data demands and turn information into actionable insight.

Specific use cases where Hadoop adds value data strategy include:

  1. Archiving
  2. Streaming
  3. Machine learning

When Healthcare Data Analysts Fulfill the Data Detective Role (White Paper)

There’s a new way to think about healthcare data analysts. Give them the responsibilities of a data detective. If ever there were a Sherlock Holmes of healthcare analytics, it’s the analyst who thinks like a detective. Part scientist, part bloodhound, part magician, the healthcare data detective thrives on discovery, extracting pearls of insight where others have previously returned emptyhanded. This valuable role comprises critical thinkers, story engineers, and sleuths who look at healthcare data in a different way. Three attributes define the data detective:

  1. They are inquisitive and relentless with their questions.
  2. They let the data inform.
  3. They drive to the heart of what matters.

Innovative analytics leaders understand the importance of supporting the data analyst through the data detective career track, and the need to start developing this role right away in the pursuit of outcomes improvement in all healthcare domains.

The Four Balancing Acts Involved with Healthcare Data Security Frameworks (White Paper)

There’s a lot at stake for healthcare organizations when it comes to securing data. A primary concern is to protect privacy and avoid costly breaches or leaks, but at the same time, data must be accessible if it’s to be used for actionable insights. This executive report introduces four balancing acts that organizations must maintain to build an ideal data security framework:

  1. Monitoring
  2. Data de-identification
  3. Cloud environments
  4. User access

This can be a tug-of-war between IT and security, two groups that often have divergent interests, however well-meaning they may be. Healthcare systems that build bridges between these interests and strike the crucial balance between data utilization and security can dial in on long-term goals, like better care at a lower cost and overall outcomes improvement.

The Who, What, and How of Health Outcome Measures (Executive Report)

Even though thousands of health outcome measures have the potential to impact the work we do every day, how well do we really understand them? In this article, we take a close look at the definitions, origins, and characteristics of health outcome measures. We break down the financial relevance of certain measures, the relationship between outcome measures and ACOs, and which measures impede, rather than enhance, a typical healthcare system. We review the role of an enterprise data warehouse and analytics, and we touch on the future of health outcome measures, all in an effort to provide deeper insight into some of the mechanics behind outcomes improvement.