Data, AI, & Analytics

Insights

Health Catalyst Editors

Why Data-Driven Healthcare Is the Best Defense Against COVID-19

COVID-19 has given data-driven healthcare the opportunity to prove its value on the national and global stages. Health systems, researchers, and policymakers have leveraged data to drive critical decisions from short-term emergency response to long-term recovery planning.
Five areas of pandemic response and recovery stand out for their robust use of data and measurable impact on the course of the outbreak and the individuals and frontline providers at its center:

Scaling the hospital command center to pandemic proportions.
Meeting patient surge demands on hospital capacity.
Controlling disease spread.
Fueling global research.
Responding to financial strain.

Health Catalyst Editors

Safeguarding the Ethics of AI in Healthcare: Three Best Practices

As artificial intelligence (AI) permeates the healthcare industry, analytics leaders must ensure that AI remains ethical and beneficial to all patient populations. In absence of a formal regulatory or governing body to enforce AI standards, it’s up to healthcare professionals to safeguard ethics in healthcare AI.
The potential for AI’s use in support of the pandemic response can have enormous payoffs. However, ensuring its ethical implementation may prove challenging if healthcare professionals are not familiar with the accuracy and limitations of AI-generated recommendations. Understanding how data scientists calculate algorithms, what data they use, and how to interpret it is critical to using AI in a meaningful and ethical manner to improve care delivery. By adhering to best practices for healthcare AI, health systems can guard against bias, ensure patient privacy, and maximize efficiencies while assisting humanity.

Daniel Orenstein, JD

Exceptions to Information Blocking Defined in Proposed Rule: Here’s What You Need to Know

Information blocking practices inhibit care coordination, interoperability, and healthcare’s forward progress.  The ONC’s proposed rule ushers in the next phase of the Cures Act by defining information blocking practices and allowed exceptions. To make the final rule as strong as possible, exceptions should be narrowly defined. In proposed form these include the following:

Preventing Harm.
Promoting the Privacy of EHI.
Promoting the Security of EHI.
Recovering Costs Reasonably Incurred.
Responding to Request that are Infeasible.
Licensing of Interoperability Elements on Reasonable and Non-discriminatory Terms.
Maintaining and Improving Health IT Performance.

This article covers each of these exceptions and discusses what to watch for in the final version of the rule.