Health Catalyst Recommends

Healthcare Transformation - Recently Added

Short on time? We've picked the best content for you to start with.

Marie Dunn

No More Excuses: We Need Disruptive Innovation in Healthcare Now

U.S. healthcare is one of the most technologically advanced industries in the world, yet it has such a difficult time transforming some of its most mundane problems (cost, quality, and service). With these problems, we are not so different from many other industries, so we should be able to learn from the individuals and industries that have succeeded in finding answers. At the same time, we need to recognize that healthcare is incredibly complex, so we need to search within for barriers that prevent disruption and innovation. The future of healthcare lies in technology, but more importantly, in our ability to pave the way for its implementation starting right now.

Read More
My Folder
Dr. John Haughom

5 Reasons the Practice of Evidence-Based Medicine Is a Hot Topic

Evidence-based medicine is an important model of care because it offers health systems a way to achieve the goals of the Triple Aim. It also offers health systems an opportunity to thrive in this era of value-based care. In specific, there are five reasons the industry is interested in the practice of evidence-based medicine: (1) With the explosion of scientific knowledge being published, it’s difficult for clinicians to stay current on the latest best practices. (2) Improved technology enables healthcare workers to have better access to data and knowledge. (3) Payers, employers, and patients are driving the need for the industry to show transparency, accountability, and value. (4) There is broad evidence that Americans often do not get the care they need. (5) Evidence-based medicine works. While the practice of evidence-based medicine is growing in popularity, moving an entire organization to a new model of care presents challenges. First, clinicians need to change how they were taught to practice. Second, providers are already busy with increasingly larger and larger workloads. Using a five-step framework, though, enables clinicians to begin to incorporate evidence-based medicine into their practices. The five steps include (1) Asking a clinical question to identify a key problem. (2) Acquiring the best evidence possible. (3) Appraising the evidence and making sure it’s applicable to the population and the question being asked. (4) Applying the evidence to daily clinical practice. (5) Assessing performance.

Read More
My Folder

Healthcare Transformation - Additional Content

Spend time reading content for you

Reducing Unwanted Variation in Healthcare Clears the Way for Outcomes Improvement

According to statistician W. Edwards Deming, “Uncontrolled variation is the enemy of quality.” The statement is particularly true of outcomes improvement in healthcare, where variation threatens quality across processes and outcomes. To improve outcomes, health systems must recognize where and how inconsistency impacts their outcomes and reduce unwanted variation. There are three key steps to reducing unwanted variation:

  1. Remove obstacles to success on a communitywide level.
  2. Maintain open lines of communication and share lessons learned.
  3. Decrease the magnitude of variation.

Read More
My Folder

5 Reasons the Practice of Evidence-Based Medicine Is a Hot Topic

Evidence-based medicine is an important model of care because it offers health systems a way to achieve the goals of the Triple Aim. It also offers health systems an opportunity to thrive in this era of value-based care. In specific, there are five reasons the industry is interested in the practice of evidence-based medicine: (1) With the explosion of scientific knowledge being published, it’s difficult for clinicians to stay current on the latest best practices. (2) Improved technology enables healthcare workers to have better access to data and knowledge. (3) Payers, employers, and patients are driving the need for the industry to show transparency, accountability, and value. (4) There is broad evidence that Americans often do not get the care they need. (5) Evidence-based medicine works. While the practice of evidence-based medicine is growing in popularity, moving an entire organization to a new model of care presents challenges. First, clinicians need to change how they were taught to practice. Second, providers are already busy with increasingly larger and larger workloads. Using a five-step framework, though, enables clinicians to begin to incorporate evidence-based medicine into their practices. The five steps include (1) Asking a clinical question to identify a key problem. (2) Acquiring the best evidence possible. (3) Appraising the evidence and making sure it’s applicable to the population and the question being asked. (4) Applying the evidence to daily clinical practice. (5) Assessing performance.

Read More
My Folder

Going Beyond Genomics in Precision Medicine: What’s Next

Precision medicine processes, while involving genomics, are not confined to working with data about an individual’s genes, environment, and lifestyle. Precision medicine also means putting patients on the right path of care, taking into consideration other individual tolerances, such as participation and cost. Precision medicine processes incorporate data beyond the individual, pulling in socio-economic data, as well as relevant internal and external data, to create an entire patient data ecosystem. With reusable data modules, this information is processed within a closed-loop analytics framework to facilitate clinical decision making at the point of care. This optimizes clinical workflow, thus leading to more precise medicine.

Read More
My Folder

No More Excuses: We Need Disruptive Innovation in Healthcare Now

U.S. healthcare is one of the most technologically advanced industries in the world, yet it has such a difficult time transforming some of its most mundane problems (cost, quality, and service). With these problems, we are not so different from many other industries, so we should be able to learn from the individuals and industries that have succeeded in finding answers. At the same time, we need to recognize that healthcare is incredibly complex, so we need to search within for barriers that prevent disruption and innovation. The future of healthcare lies in technology, but more importantly, in our ability to pave the way for its implementation starting right now.

Read More
My Folder

The Real Opportunity of Precision Medicine and How to Not Miss Out

Precision medicine, defined as a new model of patient-powered research that will give clinicians the ability to select the best treatment for an individual patient, holds the key that will allow health IT to merge advances in genomics research with new methods for managing and analyzing large data sets. This will accelerate research and biomedical discoveries. However, clinical improvements are often designed to reduce variation. So, how do systems balance tailoring medicine to each patient with standardizing care? The answer is precise registries. For example, using registries that can account for the most accurate, specific patients and disease, clinicians can use gene variant knowledge bases to provide personalized care.

Read More
My Folder

Top 7 Financial Healthcare Trends and Challenges for 2016

Healthcare financial leaders will encounter a myriad of challenges and improvement opportunities in 2016. 2016 will force health system financial leadership to focus and prioritize, with challenges including increased healthcare spending, continued momentum toward value-based care, and the need to reexamine the revenue cycle after years of focusing so intently on ICD-10. But 2016’s financial healthcare trends include more than just challenges; exciting opportunities abound, from using technology to engage patients to a national focus on population health. Engaged healthcare financial leaders—particularly those with the characteristics of effective leaders (resilient, collaborative, and inspirational)—are positioned to stay ahead of the curve in 2016.

Read More
My Folder

Michael Porter and Others Show How to Deliver Better Care in Value-based Healthcare Documentary

Healthcare organizations from Hamburg to Gothenburg to Boston are realizing the future of care delivery through a value-based approach, as portrayed in this video documentary featuring professor Michael Porter of the Harvard Business School. Measured Outcomes: A Future View of Value-Based Healthcare explains how value-based care is a methodology that involves standardizing outcome measurements, tracking them over the long term, and putting clinical teams in place with the longevity needed to build a sustainable program. More importantly, it is healthcare that matters most to patients because they report and track their own quality measurements, giving them a say in their own healthcare experience. Providers are winning, patients are winning, and the results for the organizations showcased in this video are remarkable, such as an 88 percent prostatectomy success rate for the Martini-Klinik in Hamburg, Germany, compared to a 32.8 percent rate for the rest of the country. And with just 10 surgeons on staff, they are doing more volume than any other facility in the world, by far, all attributable to their value-based approach.

Read More
My Folder

Pragmatic Innovation in Healthcare: Taking Risk and Establishing Partnerships

Investment and innovation in healthcare is driven by health system providers partnering with entrepreneurs. During my time at venture capital companies, I saw how sharing risk could marry the concept of innovation with pragmatism. Health Catalyst uses Pragmatic Innovation as an operating principle. This is evident on a company-level and in the risks we take with our client-partners, such as Allina Health. Earlier this year, Health Catalyst and Allina Health announced an exciting innovation in healthcare: a true partnership to improve outcomes. Each party took a risk, and each will share in the improvements derived.

Read More
My Folder

The Truth About Changing Healthcare Reimbursements: A Q&A with Dale Sanders

We sat down with Senior Vice President of Strategy, Dale Sanders, and asked him about healthcare reimbursements, risk models, and how physicians are handling these changes. Dale explains that reimbursements aren’t changing very fast. And in today’s risk models, there isn’t a lot of risk for providers or insurance companies. Good data and a strong culture around change are the best predictors of success. Federal ACOs have invested far more than they’ve recovered and few are willing to re-enroll in the ACO program unless major changes are made. As for looking at high-risk patients, most of the high-risk interventions have focused on preventable readmissions, motivated by CMS penalties. There seem to be two root categories for interventions: provider-centric (better discharge planning; scheduling follow-up visits at the time of discharge) and patient-centric (the socio-economic factors like transportation to care and lifestyle challenges). Finally, when data is introduced into a physician’s practice, most are surprised by how little they actually use evidence-based best practices.

Read More
My Folder

My Personal Experience with Dr. Shetty’s Healthcare Mission: An $800 Heart Surgery

I spent a few weeks this summer creating a documentary of the work of Dr. Devi Shetty. One of the most memorable moments of this experience was when I talked with Dr. Shetty himself while he was performing a heart operation on an 18-month-old boy. It was an enlightening and amazing time, where I fully learned why Dr. Shetty deserves the title bestowed on him by the WSJ, the “Henry Ford of healthcare.” His ultimate goal is to reduce the cost of heart surgery from $3,000 to $800 by evaluating each cost component. He has opened hospitals all across the world offering low-cost, high-quality care. Could this model work for the U.S.? It’s a wonderful thing to hope for.

Read More
My Folder

Innovation in Healthcare: Why It’s Needed and Where It’s Going

Healthcare organizations are facing unprecedented challenges to improve quality and reduce waste. The traditional encounter-based delivery model is overwhelmed due to aging Baby Boomers and the increasing prevalence of chronic disease. To tackle these challenges, more disruptive innovation is needed in healthcare. We already have development of new diagnostic procedures, therapies, drugs, and medical devices, but healthcare needs more innovation around prevention and personalized care. Sensors, wearable technology, and big data offer ways for healthcare to start exploring new possibility and opportunities in this realm.

Read More
My Folder

Three Ways Doctors Can Use Patient Data to Get Better Results

Vast new pools of patient data will become available to physicians over the next few years. This data will change our understanding of health and disease, providing a rich new resource to improve clinical care and maximize patient health and well-being. Three ways physician will use this data to drive transformation include: 1. Efficient and effective operations (reducing wasteful spending); 2. Manage population health; and 3. New technology-enabled care and personalized medicine. The impact of new data on healthcare costs will be immense.

Read More
My Folder

How Technology-enabled Care Models Can Help Fix Healthcare’s Greatest Challenges

The U.S. healthcare system faces a multitude of challenges, from an unprecedented growth in demand to widespread waste to serious quality issues. The healthcare resource consumption rate is expected to rise to almost 20% of the national GDP by 2022, threatening the nation’s economy. These realities mean that healthcare must emphasize value production and use more efficient care models to complement the traditional encounter-based care model. New technology-enabled care models are allowing care providers to remotely manage health problems and create better outcomes for patients with chronic conditions. Wearable sensors can collect information about a patient’s physiological condition, activity, behaviors, and environment and transmit it to providers, who can act proactively on health concerns before they become a bigger problem. All of this new type of data will require health systems to build analysis of Big Data into their core competencies.

Read More
My Folder

Genomic Medicine: Personalized Care for Just Pennies

In April 2003, the Human Genome Project was completed and scientists gained the ability to read the entire genetic blueprint for human beings. Since that time, the cost of gene sequencing has fallen from $100 million to $1,000. By 2020, the cost is expected to be mere pennies. Using the power of genomes scientists have found genomic defects for more than 5,000 inherited diseases and are on track to uncover 4,000 more. The implications for treatment of disease are also vast. In the future, clinicians will be able to use genomic-powered personalized medicine to treat patients on an individual basis knowing exactly how their genes will react to treatments and what the best course of action will be.

Read More
My Folder

The Story Behind the Inspirational Video About Healthcare Transformation, From the Heart

Through a series of happy coincidences, when Dale Sanders was looking for the next move in his career, he ended up at the Cayman Islands Health Services Authority, and started on the path of an amazing story that we’ve decided to share through a documentary. You see, six months after starting as the CEO, he met Dr. Devi Shetty and his team from Narayana Health System in India. They had a unique proposition: built a 2,000-bed hospital, medical school, and long-term care facility in the Cayman Islands, based on the ground-breaking ideas that had worked in India, that could meet the need for high-quality, low-cost healthcare . In spring of 2014, Dr. Shetty and his team, in collaboration with the Cayman Islands government, Ascension Health in the U.S., and prominent businessman, Gene Thompson, opened the doors on the first phase of the project, a 200-bed hospital specializing in cardiothoracic and orthopedic surgery. The documentary describes how they are using many innovative approaches and data to drive out significant costs while maintaining high standards of quality, leading to what many are calling a truly “breakthrough” model for healthcare. Our mission at Health Catalyst is to transform healthcare, hence we wanted to share the amazing work Dr. Shetty and his team do in India, and now, in the Cayman Islands. Health Catalyst funded, produced, and directed this documentary, From the Heart, with no financial relationship and nothing to gain. We simply believe it is a story that must be told.

Read More
My Folder

Is the Health Sensor Revolution About to Dramatically Change Healthcare?

Technology is growing at an exponential rate and while healthcare has experienced some effects of this, nowhere is this more evident than in the field of health sensors. The Internet of Things is the idea of an ecosystem of devices that connect to software giving feedback and analytics on the person or object using the device. Clinically, this can mean improved monitoring of vital signs, infusions, etc. Outpatient care is also affects by sensors and has the potential to lower the annual costs of managing chronic diseases.

Read More
My Folder

The Rising Healthcare Revolution: The Future Is Already Here

We are now experiencing the beginning of a true data-driven improvement revolution in healthcare. From germ theory in the 1870s to the use of randomized control trails in the 1970s, approximately every 50 years healthcare undergoes a revolution that fundamentally changes patient care and the way physicians practice. We are overdue to another revolution, but it’s starting with the trend toward the use of advanced analytics and the systemization of care.

Read More
My Folder

An Updated Version of the Anatomy of Healthcare Delivery Model

Read about the recent refinements to this breakthrough model and framework, developed and refined by Dr. David Burton during his 25 years of executive healthcare experience. With revisions to the descriptions and visual elements, the new and enhanced diagram makes it easy to understand the scientific flow of care as understood by physicians and advanced practice clinicians.

Read More
My Folder

Healthcare Data Should Help, Not Hinder, the Human Endeavor

The patient-provider relationship stands to suffer if we’re not careful about how we implement and use healthcare data and technology. For example, a young woman with a rash on her hands visits two different doctors. The first doctor barely looks up from his computer long enough to write her a prescription. The second doctor using the computer and asks a series of questions to figure out that the patient actually has a latex allergy from the gloves she uses to serve food at her work. And while data is not new, actionable data and analytics are opening new opportunities for physicians to improve care and reduce waste.

Read More
My Folder

A Time for Revolutionary Thinking: Three Things Clinicians Can Do to Shape the Debate on Healthcare Reform

Politicians and policy makers should not be leading the charge for change in the healthcare industry. Healthcare costs have spiraled out of control, and the healthcare mantra “first do no harm” doesn’t seem to apply anymore when we consider that there is, actually, an acceptable level of harm in the care we provide today. Clinicians need to lead the charge to build a new system that is well-resourced but affordable and efficient. This challenge is too important to be left to politicians and policymakers. The new system must be data-driven, outcomes-focused, and deliver the appropriate level and type of care, no more, no less. If we view this challenge as an opportunity, there’s no telling what we can accomplish.

Read More
My Folder

Preventable Medical Errors: The Future is Calling Us

Healthcare’s journey to improving care and reducing preventable medical errors is a difficult one. But those who embrace the changes are finding new, exciting opportunities. Some of the new realities are reflected in the American Board of Medical Specialties Maintenance of Certification program: Professionalism, Patient care, Medical knowledge, Practice-based learning and improvement, Interpersonal and communication skills, and Systems-based practice. While this has created considerable friction, it is possible to make this shift as part of an integrated practice, like Mayo Clinic and M.D. Anderson Cancer Center have done. Healthcare needs an environment to better manage complexity, not add to it. This is possible and it is happening today.

Read More
My Folder

What Healthcare Executives Can Learn from Military Decision Making

Dale Sanders, SVP at Health Catalyst, gave a presentation covering  healthcare analytics strategy at the recent Plante Moran executive Healthcare Summit. He covered similarities between his former career in assessing nuclear threats for the US Air Force and NSA, and his role today in advising effective use of healthcare analytics. His session covered the Healthcare Analytics Adoption Model and how organizations need to take a systematic, strategic approach to implementing new software solutions. He also covered the importance of establishing a healthcare data acquisition plan, in light of the coming patient-driven sources of data, such as wearable devices.

Read More
My Folder