Healthcare Transformation

Insights

Health Catalyst Editors

Health Catalyst Named 2019 Healthcare IT Corporate Innovator

Utah HIMSS (UHIMSS) recognized Health Catalyst for its innovative leadership with the 2019 UHIMSS Healthcare IT Corporate Innovator award. Dale Sanders, Health Catalyst President of Technology, accepted the honor on behalf of his organization at the UHIMSS 2019 spring conference on May 17. He shared some key insights into what makes a great environment for ongoing innovation, including these valuable sources for invention and originality:

Mischief
Humor
Depression
Pen and paper
Naivety
Pattern recognition
Walking

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Dale Sanders

Bridging the Data and Trust Gaps: Why Health Catalyst Entered the Life Sciences Market

Why would a healthcare data warehousing and analytics company partner with the life sciences industry? Because trust and collaboration across the industry—between life sciences, healthcare delivery systems, and insurance—is the only path to real healthcare transformation.
Health Catalyst recognizes an industrywide improvement opportunity in collaborating with life sciences to build mutual trust, integrate data, and leverage analytics insights for a common interest (i.e., patient outcomes). By aligning themselves around human health fulfillment, Health Catalyst, their provider partners, and life sciences will advance important healthcare goals:

Improving clinical trial design and execution.
Stimulating clinical innovation.
Supporting population health.
Reducing pharmaceutical costs.
Improving drug safety and pharmacovigilance.

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Greg Miller

Interoperability in Healthcare Data: A Life-Saving Advantage

When health system clinicians make care decisions based on their organization’s EHR data alone, they’re only using a small portion of patient health information. Additional data sources—such as health information exchanges (HIEs) and patient-generated and -reported data—round out the full picture of an individual’s health and healthcare needs. This comprehensive insight enables critical, and sometimes life-saving, treatment and health management choices.
To leverage the data from beyond the four walls of a health system and combine it with clinical, financial, and operational EHR data, organizations need an interoperable platform approach to health data. The Health Catalyst® Data Operating System (DOS™), for example, combines, manages, and leverages disparate forms of health data for a complete view of the patient and more accurate insights into the best care decisions.

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Elia Stupka

Extended Real-World Data: The Life Science Industry’s Number One Asset

The life science industry has historically relied on sanitized clinical trials and commoditized data sources (largely claims) to inform its drug development process—an under-substantiated approach that didn’t reflect how a new drug would affect broader patient populations. In an effort to gain more accurate insight into the patient experience and bring drugs to market more efficiently and safely, the industry is now expanding into extended real-world data (RWD).
To access the needed breadth and depth of patient-centric data, life science companies must partner with a healthcare transformation company that has three key qualities:

A broad and deep data asset.
Extensive provider partnerships.
An outcomes-improvement engine to support the next generation of drug development.

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Health Catalyst Editors

The Top Five 2019 Healthcare Trends

Bobbi Brown, MBA, and Stephen Grossbart, PhD have analyzed the biggest changes in the healthcare industry and 2018 and forecasted the trends to watch for in 2019. This report, based on their January 2019, covers the biggest 2019 healthcare trends, including the following:

The business of healthcare including new market entrants, business models and shifting strategies to stay competitive.
Increased consumer demand for more transparency
Continuous quality and cost control monitoring across populations.
CMS proposals to push ACOs into two-sided risk models.
Fewer process measures but more quality outcomes scrutiny for providers.

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Health Catalyst Editors

Emergency Department Quality Improvement: Transforming the Delivery of Care

Overcrowding in the emergency department has been associated with increased inpatient mortality, increased length of stay, and increased costs for admitted patients. ED wait times and patients who leave without seeing a qualified medical provider are indicators of overcrowding. A data-driven system approach is needed to address these problems and redesign the delivery of emergency care.
This article explores common problems in emergency care and insights into embarking on a successful quality improvement journey to transform care delivery in the ED, including an exploration of the following topics:

A four-step approach to redesigning the delivery of emergency care.
Understanding ED performance.
Revising High-Impact Workflows.
Revising Staffing Patterns.
Setting Leadership Expectations.
Improving the Patient Experience.

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Health Catalyst

Five Reasons Why Health Catalyst Acquired Medicity and What It Means for Interoperability, as Explained by Dale Sanders, President of Technology

Why did Health Catalyst acquire Medicity? Dale Sanders, President of Technology, shares five reasons and what it means for interoperability:

Medicity has several petabytes of valuable data content.
Medicity’s data governance expertise.
Medicity’s 7 x 24 real-time cloud operations expertise.
Medicity’s expertise in real-time EHR integration.
Medicity’s presence and expertise in the loosely affiliated, community ambulatory care management space.

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Ann Tinker, MSN, RN
Dan Hopkins

Transforming Healthcare Analytics: Five Critical Steps

By committing to transforming healthcare analytics, organizations can eventually save hundreds of millions of dollars (depending on their size) and achieve comprehensive outcomes improvement. The transformation helps organizations achieve the analytics efficiency needed to navigate the complex healthcare landscape of technology, regulatory, and financial challenges and the challenges of value-based care.
To achieve analytics transformation and ROI within a short timeframe, organizations can follow five phases to become data driven:

Establish a data-driven culture.
Acquire and access data.
Establish data stewardship.
Establish data quality.
Spread data use.

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David Crockett

The Real Opportunity of Precision Medicine and How to Not Miss Out

Precision medicine, defined as a new model of patient-powered research that will give clinicians the ability to select the best treatment for an individual patient, holds the key that will allow health IT to merge advances in genomics research with new methods for managing and analyzing large data sets. This will accelerate research and biomedical discoveries. However, clinical improvements are often designed to reduce variation. So, how do systems balance tailoring medicine to each patient with standardizing care? The answer is precise registries. For example, using registries that can account for the most accurate, specific patients and disease, clinicians can use gene variant knowledge bases to provide personalized care.

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Russ Staheli, MPH

Advanced Analytics Holds the Key to Achieve the Triple Aim and Survive Value-based Purchasing

Every hospital and health system has to juggle significant IT needs with a limited budget. In the middle of these demands and possibilities, hospital executives have to prioritize and decide which technology solutions are the most critical to the health of their organization. I call these most critical IT solutions “survival software.” Advanced clinical analytics solutions are the survival software of the near future, as they really hold the key to achieving the triple aim and survive value-based purchasing.

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Bobbi Brown, MBA

The Best Solution for Declining Medicare Reimbursements

I am one of the brave souls who takes the time to read the report issued each spring by the Medicare Payment Advisory Commission (Medpac). The report shows the numbers of Medicare beneficiaries and claims are growing; healthcare organizations are increasingly losing money on Medicare; payment increases certainly will not keep pace with declining margins; and Medicare policies will continue to incentivize quality and push providers to assume more risk. But the report also reveals that some healthcare organizations—referred to as “relatively efficient”—are making money from Medicare with an average 2 percent margin. How do you become one of these organizations? And how do you target and counter Medicare trends that impact your business?

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Imran Qureshi

Healthcare Analytics Platform: DOS Delivers the 7 Essential Components

The Data Operating System (DOS™) is a vast data and analytics ecosystem whose laser focus is to rapidly and efficiently improve outcomes across every healthcare domain. DOS is a cornerstone in the foundation for building the future of healthcare analytics. This white paper from Imran Qureshi details the seven capabilities of DOS that combine to unlock data for healthcare improvement:

Acquire
Organize
Standardize
Analyze
Deliver
Orchestrate
Extend

These seven components will reveal how DOS is a data-first system that can extract value from healthcare data and allow leadership and analytics teams to fully develop the insights necessary for health system transformation.

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Dale Sanders

Seven Ways DOS™ Simplifies the Complexities of Healthcare IT

Health Catalyst Data Operating System (DOS) is a revolutionary architecture that addresses the digital and data problems confronting healthcare now and in the future. It is an analytics galaxy that encompasses data platforms, machine learning, analytics applications, and the fabric to stitch all these components together.
DOS addresses these seven critical areas of healthcare IT:

Healthcare data management and acquisition
Integrating data in mergers and acquisitions
Enabling a personal health record
Scaling existing, homegrown data warehouses
Ingesting the human health data ecosystem
Providers becoming payers
Extending the life and current value of EHR investments

This white paper illustrates these healthcare system needs detail and explains the attributes of DOS. Read how DOS is the right technology for tackling healthcare’s big issues, including big data, physician burnout, rising healthcare expenses, and the productivity backfire created by other healthcare technologies.

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Daniel Orenstein, JD

Healthcare Reform: Is Bipartisan Legislation Possible?

The effort to repeal and replace the ACA in 2017 failed, leaving the industry wondering if bipartisan healthcare reform is possible in today’s political climate. This article explains why it is possible, by taking a close look at why repeal and replace failed, and why the 21st Century Cures Act and MACRA have been successful.
To stand a chance of being successful, proposed bipartisan healthcare legislation will most likely have one (or more) of five features:

Driven by practical need rather than politics.
Focuses on cost control/cost reduction.
Targets areas that are expected to save money.
Doesn’t involve creating new programs.
Stabilizes the ACA.

There are many bipartisan healthcare legislation opportunities, from expanding the use of HSAs to innovation waivers; opportunities that won’t come to fruition unless the proposed legislation tackles practical problems.

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Leslie Falk

Population Health Documentary Highlights Three Success Stories Transforming Healthcare

The documentary, “A Coalition of the Willing: Data-Driven Population Health and Complex Care Innovation in Low-Income Communities” shows how precision medicine and care management can be effective tools for successful population health. The film highlights three programs that use data to hotspot populations of high-risk, high-need patients, and then deploy unique, targeted care management inventions. The documentary, which initially aired during the 2017 Healthcare Analytics Summit, presents hopeful solutions, scalable across diverse patient populations, that are leading to exceptional results and the future of healthcare transformation.

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Josh Ferguson APRN, ACNP, ANP-BC

Reducing Unwanted Variation in Healthcare Clears the Way for Outcomes Improvement

According to statistician W. Edwards Deming, “Uncontrolled variation is the enemy of quality.” The statement is particularly true of outcomes improvement in healthcare, where variation threatens quality across processes and outcomes. To improve outcomes, health systems must recognize where and how inconsistency impacts their outcomes and reduce unwanted variation.
There are three key steps to reducing unwanted variation:

Remove obstacles to success on a communitywide level.
Maintain open lines of communication and share lessons learned.
Decrease the magnitude of variation.

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John Haughom, MD

5 Reasons the Practice of Evidence-Based Medicine Is a Hot Topic

Evidence-based medicine is an important model of care because it offers health systems a way to achieve the goals of the Triple Aim. It also offers health systems an opportunity to thrive in this era of value-based care. In specific, there are five reasons the industry is interested in the practice of evidence-based medicine: (1) With the explosion of scientific knowledge being published, it’s difficult for clinicians to stay current on the latest best practices. (2) Improved technology enables healthcare workers to have better access to data and knowledge. (3) Payers, employers, and patients are driving the need for the industry to show transparency, accountability, and value. (4) There is broad evidence that Americans often do not get the care they need. (5) Evidence-based medicine works. While the practice of evidence-based medicine is growing in popularity, moving an entire organization to a new model of care presents challenges. First, clinicians need to change how they were taught to practice. Second, providers are already busy with increasingly larger and larger workloads. Using a five-step framework, though, enables clinicians to begin to incorporate evidence-based medicine into their practices. The five steps include (1) Asking a clinical question to identify a key problem. (2) Acquiring the best evidence possible. (3) Appraising the evidence and making sure it’s applicable to the population and the question being asked. (4) Applying the evidence to daily clinical practice. (5) Assessing performance.

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David Crockett

Going Beyond Genomics in Precision Medicine: What’s Next

Precision medicine processes, while involving genomics, are not confined to working with data about an individual’s genes, environment, and lifestyle. Precision medicine also means putting patients on the right path of care, taking into consideration other individual tolerances, such as participation and cost. Precision medicine processes incorporate data beyond the individual, pulling in socio-economic data, as well as relevant internal and external data, to create an entire patient data ecosystem. With reusable data modules, this information is processed within a closed-loop analytics framework to facilitate clinical decision making at the point of care. This optimizes clinical workflow, thus leading to more precise medicine.

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Marie Dunn

No More Excuses: We Need Disruptive Innovation in Healthcare Now

U.S. healthcare is one of the most technologically advanced industries in the world, yet it has such a difficult time transforming some of its most mundane problems (cost, quality, and service). With these problems, we are not so different from many other industries, so we should be able to learn from the individuals and industries that have succeeded in finding answers. At the same time, we need to recognize that healthcare is incredibly complex, so we need to search within for barriers that prevent disruption and innovation. The future of healthcare lies in technology, but more importantly, in our ability to pave the way for its implementation starting right now.

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Bobbi Brown, MBA

Top 7 Financial Healthcare Trends and Challenges for 2016

Healthcare financial leaders will encounter a myriad of challenges and improvement opportunities in 2016.
2016 will force health system financial leadership to focus and prioritize, with challenges including increased healthcare spending, continued momentum toward value-based care, and the need to reexamine the revenue cycle after years of focusing so intently on ICD-10.
But 2016’s financial healthcare trends include more than just challenges; exciting opportunities abound, from using technology to engage patients to a national focus on population health.
Engaged healthcare financial leaders—particularly those with the characteristics of effective leaders (resilient, collaborative, and inspirational)—are positioned to stay ahead of the curve in 2016.

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Paul Horstmeier

Michael Porter and Others Show How to Deliver Better Care in Value-based Healthcare Documentary

Healthcare organizations from Hamburg to Gothenburg to Boston are realizing the future of care delivery through a value-based approach, as portrayed in this video documentary featuring professor Michael Porter of the Harvard Business School. Measured Outcomes: A Future View of Value-Based Healthcare explains how value-based care is a methodology that involves standardizing outcome measurements, tracking them over the long term, and putting clinical teams in place with the longevity needed to build a sustainable program. More importantly, it is healthcare that matters most to patients because they report and track their own quality measurements, giving them a say in their own healthcare experience. Providers are winning, patients are winning, and the results for the organizations showcased in this video are remarkable, such as an 88 percent prostatectomy success rate for the Martini-Klinik in Hamburg, Germany, compared to a 32.8 percent rate for the rest of the country. And with just 10 surgeons on staff, they are doing more volume than any other facility in the world, by far, all attributable to their value-based approach.

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Kyle Salyers

Pragmatic Innovation in Healthcare: Taking Risk and Establishing Partnerships

Investment and innovation in healthcare is driven by health system providers partnering with entrepreneurs. During my time at venture capital companies, I saw how sharing risk could marry the concept of innovation with pragmatism. Health Catalyst uses Pragmatic Innovation as an operating principle. This is evident on a company-level and in the risks we take with our client-partners, such as Allina Health. Earlier this year, Health Catalyst and Allina Health announced an exciting innovation in healthcare: a true partnership to improve outcomes. Each party took a risk, and each will share in the improvements derived.

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Dale Sanders

The Truth About Changing Healthcare Reimbursements: A Q&A with Dale Sanders

We sat down with Senior Vice President of Strategy, Dale Sanders, and asked him about healthcare reimbursements, risk models, and how physicians are handling these changes. Dale explains that reimbursements aren’t changing very fast. And in today’s risk models, there isn’t a lot of risk for providers or insurance companies. Good data and a strong culture around change are the best predictors of success. Federal ACOs have invested far more than they’ve recovered and few are willing to re-enroll in the ACO program unless major changes are made. As for looking at high-risk patients, most of the high-risk interventions have focused on preventable readmissions, motivated by CMS penalties. There seem to be two root categories for interventions: provider-centric (better discharge planning; scheduling follow-up visits at the time of discharge) and patient-centric (the socio-economic factors like transportation to care and lifestyle challenges). Finally, when data is introduced into a physician’s practice, most are surprised by how little they actually use evidence-based best practices.

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Chris Keller

My Personal Experience with Dr. Shetty’s Healthcare Mission: An $800 Heart Surgery

I spent a few weeks this summer creating a documentary of the work of Dr. Devi Shetty. One of the most memorable moments of this experience was when I talked with Dr. Shetty himself while he was performing a heart operation on an 18-month-old boy. It was an enlightening and amazing time, where I fully learned why Dr. Shetty deserves the title bestowed on him by the WSJ, the “Henry Ford of healthcare.” His ultimate goal is to reduce the cost of heart surgery from $3,000 to $800 by evaluating each cost component. He has opened hospitals all across the world offering low-cost, high-quality care. Could this model work for the U.S.? It’s a wonderful thing to hope for.

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John Haughom, MD

Innovation in Healthcare: Why It’s Needed and Where It’s Going

Healthcare organizations are facing unprecedented challenges to improve quality and reduce waste. The traditional encounter-based delivery model is overwhelmed due to aging Baby Boomers and the increasing prevalence of chronic disease. To tackle these challenges, more disruptive innovation is needed in healthcare. We already have development of new diagnostic procedures, therapies, drugs, and medical devices, but healthcare needs more innovation around prevention and personalized care. Sensors, wearable technology, and big data offer ways for healthcare to start exploring new possibility and opportunities in this realm.

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