Analytics

Insights

Dale Sanders

Academic Medical Centers: A Triple Threat Approach to Leveraging Healthcare Analytics

Academic medical centers (AMCs) are a triple threat on the healthcare court with their combined medical center, education, and research sections. With a unique set of resources, AMCs have the ability to take a  comprehensive, holistic approach to patient care. However, one of the challenges they still face is utilizing healthcare analytics effectively within the patient care setting. With the Healthcare Analytics Adoption Model and other data expertise, AMCs can learn how to merge siloed data, while improving operations, and delivering the highest quality of care to each patient.

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Matt Denison

Healthcare Analytics for Payers: How to Thrive Through Shifting Financial Risk

To stay in sync with healthcare’s transition to value-based care, payers today must develop the analytics capability to support alternative payment models and drive more value to their members. Payers can follow an analytics roadmap to develop a strategy that extends their data, analytics, and risk management expertise to meet growing demands.
The analytics roadmap helps the payer meet these common challenges of establishing a data-driven culture:

Recruiting and retaining high-quality providers in a competitive market.
Managing increasing numbers of high-risk/high-cost members with limited resources.
Efficiently reacting to federal and state legislative and payment changes.
Controlling the rising costs of healthcare services and pharmaceuticals.

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Health Catalyst Editors

Four Steps to Effective Opportunity Analysis

Opportunity analysis uses data to identify potential improvement initiatives and quantifies the value of these initiatives—both in terms of patient care benefits and financial impact. This process is an effective way to find unwarranted and costly clinical variation and, in turn, develop strategies to reduce it, improving outcomes and saving costs along the way. Standardizing the opportunity analysis process makes it repeatable and prioritizes actionable opportunities.
Quarterly opportunity analysis should follow four steps:

Kicking off the analysis by getting analysts together to do preliminary analysis and brainstorm.
Engaging with clinicians to identify opportunities and, in the process, get clinician buy in.
Digging deeper into the suggested opportunities to prioritize those that offer the greatest benefits.
Presenting findings to the decision makers.

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Health Catalyst Editors

How to Build a Healthcare Analytics Team and Solve Strategic Problems

Health systems have vast amounts of data, but frequently struggle to use that data to solve strategic problems in a timely fashion. A healthcare analytics team, made up of the right people with the right tools and skillsets, can help address these challenges. This article walks through the steps organizations need to take to put an effective analytics team in place.
These include the following:

Recognizing the need for change.
Demonstrating the value of an analytics team.
Conducting a current state assessment.
Identifying solutions.
Implementing a phased approach.
Building a roadmap.
Making the pitch.
Putting the roadmap into action.

The article also includes the foundation skills to look for when putting together the team and tips on how best to organize.

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Josh Ferguson APRN, ACNP, ANP-BC

ICD-10 PCS: Harnessing the Power of Procedure Codes

The transition to ICD-10 in 2015 saw the number of available procedure codes increase from roughly 3,000 to more than 70,000. This change gives clinicians the ability to code procedures to a much higher degree of specificity and provides health systems the ability to unlock powerful clinical insights into how inpatient procedural care is delivered.
This article covers the benefits and drawback of ICD-10 PCS, as well as concrete ways health systems can use these procedure codes to provide new clinical insights. The article also walks through the anatomy of the seven-digit alphanumeric codes and provides specific clinical examples of how healthcare organizations can slice and dice this data.

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Dan LeSueur

How to Run Your Healthcare Analytics Operation Like a Business

A robust data analytics operation is necessary for healthcare systems’ survival. Just like any business, the analytics enterprise needs to be well managed using the principles of successful business operations.
This article walks through how to run an analytics operation like a business using the following five-question framework:

Who does the analytics team serve and what are those customers trying to do?
What services does the analytics team provide to help customers accomplish their goals?
How does the analytics team know they’re doing a great job and how do they communicate that effectively to the leadership team?
What is the most efficient way to provide analytics services?
What is the most effective way to organize?

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Leslie Falk

Increase Healthcare Analytics ROI Through the Rapid Response Analytics Solution

Health systems feel mounting pressure to demonstrate ROI from analytics investments but are faced with inefficacies and delays. Fortunately, the Rapid Response Analytics Solution delivers a 10x increase in analytics productivity and a 90 percent decrease in the time required to develop new analytic insights. The Rapid Response Analytics Solution solves these tough analytics problems through two primary elements: curated, modular data kits called DOS Marts; and Population Builder, a powerful self-service tools that lets any time of user, from physician executive to frontline nurse, explore data and quality build cohorts of patients without relying on IT staff and with no need for sophisticated and customized SQL and data science coding.

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Health Catalyst Editors

How to Evaluate Emerging Healthcare Technology With Innovative Analytics

As healthcare systems are pressured to cut costs and still provide high-quality care, they will need to look across the care continuum for answers, reduce variation in care, and look to emerging technologies. This article walks through how to evaluate the safety and effectiveness and of emerging healthcare technology and prioritize high-impact improvement projects using a robust data analytics platform. Topics covered include:

The importance of identifying variation in innovation.
Ways to improve outcomes and decrease costs.
The value of an analytics platform.
The reliable information that produce sparks for innovation.
Identifying and evaluating emerging healthcare technology.
Knowing what data to use.
The difference between efficacy and effectiveness in evaluation of emerging healthcare technology.

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Health Catalyst Editors

The Digitization of Healthcare: Why the Right Approach Matters and Five Steps to Get There

While many industries are leveraging digital transformation to accelerate their productivity and quality, healthcare ranks among the least digitized sectors. Healthcare data is largely incomplete when it comes to fully representing a patient’s health and doesn’t adequately support diagnoses and treatment, risk prediction, and long-term health care plans. But even with the obvious urgency for increased healthcare digitization, the industry must raise this trajectory with sensitivity to the impacts on clinicians and patients. The right digital strategy will not only aim for more comprehensive information on patient health, but also leverage data to empower and engage the people involved.
Health systems can follow five guidelines to digitize in a sustainable, impactful way:

Achieve and maintain clinician and patient engagement.
Adopt a modern commercial digital platform.
Digitize the assets (the patients) and the processes.
Understand the importance of data to drive AI insights.
Prioritize data volume.

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Ryan Smith

The Missing Ingredient in Healthcare Analytics: The Executive Sponsor

Despite the complexity of healthcare analytics, one key strategy for effective, sustainable analytics stands out: designating an executive sponsor to oversee the program. This sponsor is a C-suite level leader who’s committed to championing analytics throughout the organization and has the influence and relationships to drive widespread outcomes improvement.
Healthcare executives can use four criteria to identify a great executive sponsor for their analytics programs:

Have a single accountable leader.
Find a sponsor with passion for and knowledge about data.
Choose organizational clout and a vision for analytics over a specific title.
Build a partnership with the CIO.

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Elaine St. James, BSN, RN, CPHQ
Josh Ferguson APRN, ACNP, ANP-BC
Nancy Casazza, BSN, MMI, RN

How to Achieve Your Clinical Data Analytics Goals

Healthcare organizations know that they need to an effective clinical data analytics strategy to improve and survive in today’s challenging environment. In order to make these necessary improvements, healthcare leaders need to establish clear goals for their clinical data analytics initiatives.
Achieving these goals requires clinical teams to clearly identify problems and plan for how to achieve them. This article walks improvement teams through sometimes confusing process of identifying problems, setting clear, achievable goals, and common pitfalls along the way. Topics covered include:

Six categories of clinical data.
Three types of goals: outcome, process, and balance.
How to write an outcome goal.
Internal vs. External Benchmarks.
Mitigation strategies.
Getting clinical buy-in.

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Mike Dow

Healthcare NLP: Four Essentials to Make the Most of Unstructured Data

Many health systems are eager to embrace the capability of natural language processing (NLP) to access the vast patient insights recorded as unstructured text in clinical notes and records. Many healthcare data and analytics teams, however, aren’t experienced in or prepared for the unique challenges of working with text and, specifically, don’t have the knowledge to transform unstructured text into a usable format for NLP.
Data engineers can follow four need-to-know principles to meet and overcome the challenges of making unstructured text available for advanced NLP analysis:

Text is bigger and more complex.
Text comes from different data sources.
Text is stored in multiple areas.
Text user documentation patterns matter.

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Sarah Provan, BS
Caitlin Kelly

The Number One Secret of Highly Effective Healthcare Data Analysts

Data-driven quality improvement is propelling healthcare transformation. The ability to strategically leverage healthcare data is essential, making highly effective data analysts more valuable than ever. So, what attributes differentiate a good data analyst from a great analyst?
Stephen Covey’s well-known book “The 7 Habits of Highly Effective People,” has long had far-reaching impacts in the business world. These same principles are relevant today and applicable in the world of healthcare analytics. Learn how Covey’s second habit, “Begin With the End in Mind,” drives great healthcare data analysts.

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Jared Crapo
Linda Simovic

Cloud-Based Open-Platform Data Solutions: The Best Way to Meet Today’s Growing Health Data Demands

Smartphone applications, home monitoring equipment, genomic sequencing, and social determinants of health are adding significantly to the scope of healthcare data, creating new challenges for health systems in data management and storage. Traditional on-premises data warehouses, however, don’t have the capacity or capabilities to support this new era of bigger healthcare data.
Organizations must add more secure, scalable, elastic, and analytically agile cloud-based, open-platform data solutions that leverage analytics as a service (AaaS). Moving toward cloud hosting will help health systems avoid the five common challenges of on-premises data warehouses:

Predicting future demand is difficult.
Infrastructure scaling is lumpy and inelastic.
Security risk mitigation is a major investment.
Data architectures limit flexibility and are resource intensive.
Analytics expertise is misallocated.

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Jeff Selander

Employer Health Plans: Keys to Lowering Cost, Boosting Benefits

Employers that offer robust employee health plans at affordable costs are more likely to attract and retain a great workforce. Healthcare, however, is often a top expense for organizations, making balancing attractive benefits with attractive costs a complex undertaking. Employers need a deep understanding of employee populations and opportunities to manage health plan costs without sacrificing quality.
An analytics-driven approach to employee population health management gives employers insight into two key steps to lower healthcare costs and enhance benefits:

Manage easily fixed cost issues.
Use healthcare cost savings to fund expanded benefits.

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Ann Tinker, MSN, RN
Dan Hopkins

Transforming Healthcare Analytics: Five Critical Steps

By committing to transforming healthcare analytics, organizations can eventually save hundreds of millions of dollars (depending on their size) and achieve comprehensive outcomes improvement. The transformation helps organizations achieve the analytics efficiency needed to navigate the complex healthcare landscape of technology, regulatory, and financial challenges and the challenges of value-based care.
To achieve analytics transformation and ROI within a short timeframe, organizations can follow five phases to become data driven:

Establish a data-driven culture.
Acquire and access data.
Establish data stewardship.
Establish data quality.
Spread data use.

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Russ Staheli, MPH

Advanced Analytics Holds the Key to Achieve the Triple Aim and Survive Value-based Purchasing

Every hospital and health system has to juggle significant IT needs with a limited budget. In the middle of these demands and possibilities, hospital executives have to prioritize and decide which technology solutions are the most critical to the health of their organization. I call these most critical IT solutions “survival software.” Advanced clinical analytics solutions are the survival software of the near future, as they really hold the key to achieving the triple aim and survive value-based purchasing.

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Mike Dow

Five Lessons for Building Adaptive Healthcare Data Models that Support Innovation

Healthcare data models are the backbone of innovation in healthcare, without which many new technologies may never come to fruition, so it’s important to build models that focus on relevant content and specific use cases.
Health Catalyst has been continuously refining its approach to building concise yet adaptive healthcare data models for years. Because of our experience, we’ve learned five key lessons when it comes to building healthcare data models:

Focus on relevant content.
Externally validate the model.
Commit to providing vital documentation.
Prioritize long-term planning.
Automate data profiling.

These lessons are essential to apply when building adaptive healthcare data models (and their corresponding methodologies, tools, and best practices) given the prominent role they play in fueling the technologies designed to solve healthcare’s toughest problems.

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Imran Qureshi

Healthcare Analytics Platform: DOS Delivers the 7 Essential Components

The Data Operating System (DOS™) is a vast data and analytics ecosystem whose laser focus is to rapidly and efficiently improve outcomes across every healthcare domain. DOS is a cornerstone in the foundation for building the future of healthcare analytics. This white paper from Imran Qureshi details the seven capabilities of DOS that combine to unlock data for healthcare improvement:

Acquire
Organize
Standardize
Analyze
Deliver
Orchestrate
Extend

These seven components will reveal how DOS is a data-first system that can extract value from healthcare data and allow leadership and analytics teams to fully develop the insights necessary for health system transformation.

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John Wadsworth

The Healthcare Analytics Ecosystem: A Must-Have in Today’s Transformation

Healthcare organizations seeking to achieve the Quadruple Aim (enhancing patient experience, improving population health, reducing costs, and reducing clinician and staff burnout), will reach their goals by building a rich analytics ecosystem. This environment promotes synergy between technology and highly skilled analysts and relies on full interoperability, allowing people to derive the right knowledge to transform healthcare.
Five important parts make up the healthcare analytics ecosystem:

Must-have tools.
People and their skills.
Reactive, descriptive, and prescriptive analytics.
Matching technical skills to analytics work streams.
Interoperability.

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Dale Sanders

How to Evaluate a Clinical Analytics Vendor: A Checklist

Based on 25 years of healthcare IT experience, Dale outlines a detailed set of criteria for evaluating clinical analytic vendors. These criteria include 1) completeness of vision, 2) culture and values of senior leadership, 3) ability to execute, 4) technology adaptability and supportability, 5) total cost of ownership, 6) company viability, and 7) nine elements of technical specificity including data modeling, master data management, metadata, white space data, visualization, security, ETL, performance and utilization metrics, hardware and software infrastructure.

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Health Catalyst

Chilmark Report Studies the 2017 Healthcare Analytics Market Trends and Vendors

Chilmark’s 2017 Healthcare Analytics Market Trends Report is a trove of insights to the analytics solutions driving the management of population health and the transition to new reimbursement models.
The report reviews the analytics market forces at work, such as:

The need to optimize revenue under diverse payment models.
The increasing importance of analytics in general, and a platform in specific, that can aggregate all data.
Continuing confusion about how to react to MIPS and APMs.
The growing importance of providing a comprehensive set of open and standard APIs.
The need for better tools to create analytics-ready data stores.

The report is also a succinct guide to the 17 leading analytics vendors (which represent EHR, HIE, payer, and independent categories) with the most promising products, technology, and services offerings in the market.

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Jeffrey Wu

Closed-Loop Analytics Approach: Making Healthcare Data Actionable

Healthcare organizations rely on data to support informed decisions. To be truly valuable, data must be high quality and meet two criteria for end-users:

Data must be transformed from its raw, obscure form into actionable insights.
Data-driven insights must be immediately accessible at the point of care (versus in static dashboards or buried on the intranet).

Closed-Loop Analytics™ methodology transforms raw data into actionable, accessible insight—providing physicians and nurses with critical insight into their patients’ situation and how they can effectively intervene. A Closed-Loop Analytics approach will become increasingly essential as healthcare becomes more systems dependent.

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Eric Just

How to Use Text Analytics in Healthcare to Improve Outcomes—Why You Need More than NLP

Given the fact that up to 80 percent of clinical data is stored in unstructured text, healthcare organizations need to harness the power of text analytics. But, surprisingly, less than five percent of health systems use it due to resource limitations and the complexity of text analytics.
But given the industry’s necessity to use text analytics to create precise patient registries, enhance their understanding of high-risk patient populations, and improve outcomes, this executive report explains why systems must start using it—and explains how to get started.
Health systems can start using text analytics to improve outcomes by focusing on four key components:

Optimize text search (display, medical terminologies, and context).
Enhance context and extract values with an NLP pipeline.
Always validate the algorithm.
Focus on interoperability and integration using a Late-Binding approach.

This broad approach with position health systems for clinical and financial success.

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Bobbi Brown, MBA
Leslie Falk

The Best Way to Maximize Healthcare Analytics ROI

When it comes to maximizing analytics ROI in a healthcare organization, the more domains, the merrier. Texas Children’s Hospital started their outcomes improvement journey by using an EDW and analytics to improve a single process of care. It quickly realized the potential for more savings and improvement by applying analytics to additional domains, including:

Analytics efficiencies
Operations/Finance
Organization-wide clinical improvement

The competencies required to launch and sustain such an organizational sea change are all part of a single, defining characteristic: the data-driven culture. This allows fulfillment of the analytics strategy, ensures data quality and governance, encourages data and analytics literacy, standardizes data definitions, and opens access to data from multiple sources.
This article highlights the specifics of how Texas Children’s has evolved into an outcomes improvement leader, with stories about its successes in multiple domains.

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