Ed Corbett, MD

Medical Officer

Edward Corbett, MD joined Health Catalyst in June 2014 as a medical officer. He earned his medical degree at the University of Texas Health Science Center in San Antonio where he also completed his residency in Internal Medicine. He is board certified in Internal Medicine. He started his career as a physician at the Cooper Clinic in Dallas, Texas specializing in preventive medicine. Prior to joining Health Catalyst he was a physician partner at Central Utah Clinic, a large multispecialty clinic which was the first Medicare ACO in the state of Utah. He has a special interest in improving patient care through the better use of technology and has been actively involved in clinical IT throughout his career.

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Three Ways AI Can Earn Clinicians’ Trust

Over the last decade, many health systems have found that augmented intelligence (AI) technologies have overpromised and underdelivered. The promises of AI in clinical care were grand—to ease physicians’ burdens and deliver the most relevant information at the point of decision making. However, more technology has increased the demand on providers along with clinicians’ doubt of AI’s capabilities.

Organizations can still deliver valuable AI-derived patient insight to providers at the front lines of care by taking a collaborative approach to AI that enlists clinicians in three key areas:

1. Development.
2. Implementation.
3. Results.

A Sustainable Healthcare Emergency Management Framework: COVID-19 and Beyond

With an ever-changing understanding of COVID-19 and a continually fluctuating disease impact, health systems can’t rely on a single, rigid plan to guide their response and recovery efforts. An effective solution is likely a flexible framework that steers hospitals and other providers through four critical phases of a communitywide healthcare emergency:
1. Prepare for an outbreak.
2. Prevent transmission.
3. Recover from an outbreak.
4. Plan for the future.

The framework must include data-supported surveillance and containment strategies to enhance detection, reduce transmission, and manage capacity and supplies, providing a roadmap to respond to immediate demands and also support a sustainable long-term pandemic response.

A Sustainable Healthcare Emergency Management Framework: COVID-19 and Beyond

With an ever-changing understanding of COVID-19 and a continually fluctuating disease impact, health systems can’t rely on a single, rigid plan to guide their response and recovery efforts. An effective solution is likely a flexible framework that steers hospitals and other providers through four critical phases of a communitywide healthcare emergency:

1. Prepare for an outbreak.
2. Prevent transmission.
3. Recover from an outbreak.
4. Plan for the future.

The framework must include data-supported surveillance and containment strategies to enhance detection, reduce transmission, and manage capacity and supplies, providing a roadmap to respond to immediate demands and also support a sustainable long-term pandemic response.

Healthcare Trends During COVID-19: Top Five Areas to Watch

COVID-19 is now a commanding force in healthcare, and outbreak-driven trends will continue to influence the industry and impact patients for the foreseeable future. Understanding and preparing for activity in five critical categories will help health systems navigate the next phases of the COVID-19 era:


1. A potential vaccine—confronting availability and distribution challenges.
2. Virtual care—managing the best interests of patients and providers.
3. Models of care—accommodating changing delivery and long-term needs of COVID-19 patients.
4. Healthcare resource management—planning for and recovering from financial and capacity strain.
5. Data—improving accuracy, availability, and timeliness for pandemic management.

How to Scale Telehealth Solutions to Increase Patient Access During COVID-19

As health systems have faced a drop in routine, non-emergent patient care due to the novel coronavirus, they have had to be flexible and find new methods of care delivery to ensure patient access.
Telehealth—using a digital platform to conduct are remotely—benefits both patients and health systems. Although laying the groundwork for telehealth and then scaling telehealth solutions is challenging, virtual care leads to increased patient access, better patient retention, and overall reduced costs for health systems, employers, and patients.
With the right tools to build a reliable framework, organizations can effectively deliver quality care to patient populations, no matter where they live.

Physician Burnout and the EHR: Addressing Five Common Burdens

So far, the EHR hasn’t delivered on its original intent to improve patient care with more efficiency and personalization and lower cost. Instead, physician users blame the systems for worsening their experience and the quality of their care in significant ways:

1. Less time for patient interaction and worsened quality of interaction.
2. An extended workday.
3. Poor design (difficult to use).
4. Demands of quality measures.
5. Cost and maintenance.

Despite these challenges, the EHR is likely here to stay. Health systems have invested heavily in their electronic reporting systems and are now focused on making these technologies and processes work for the benefit of patients and providers. CIOs are working towards better aligning digital health goals with physician experience for an environment where EHRs enable smarter, not harder, work.

Quality Data Is Essential for Doctors Concerned with Patient Engagement

It might be a bit of a leap to associate quality data with improving the patient experience. But the pathway is apparent when you consider that physicians need data to track patient diagnoses, treatments, progress, and outcomes.
The data must be high quality (easily accessible, standardized, comprehensive) so it simplifies, rather than complicates, the physician’s job. This becomes even more important in the pursuit of population health, as care teams need to easily identify at-risk patients in need of preventive or follow-up care.
Patients engaged in their own care via portals and personal peripherals contribute to the volume and quality of data and feel empowered in the process. This physician and patient engagement leads to improved care and outcomes, and, ultimately, an improved patient experience.

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