Learn more about David Grauer, MBA, MHSA

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David Grauer, MBA, MHSA

David Grauer comes to Health Catalyst after 23 years in executive leadership positions at Intermountain Healthcare, a Utah-based, not-for-profit system of 22 hospitals, 185 clinics, and 1,400 employed physicians that is widely recognized as a leader in clinical quality improvement and in efficient healthcare delivery. For the last nine years, Grauer served as CEO/Administrator of Intermountain Medical Center, a 502-bed hospital in suburban Salt Lake City that is both Utah’s largest hospital and the flagship of Intermountain Healthcare. Previously, he was CEO/Administrator of two other Intermountain hospitals: Cottonwood Hospital and TOSH—The Orthopedic Specialty Hospital.

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David Grauer, MBA, MHSA

Addressing Healthcare Waste Through Centralization

Healthcare generates an estimated $1 trillion in waste each year, including supply costs, unnecessary tests, and surgeries that aren’t clinically indicated by best practices. One effective way health systems can reduce waste is by centralizing duplicated services into one high-performing center for that service. For example, instead of having a few cardiac catheterization (cath) labs, a health system can consolidate its cath services into one facility, cutting equipment, staffing, and space requirements.
Despite its clinical and financial benefits, centralization can be challenging for health system leaders, who may face operational and political challenges when cutting services from certain locations. To navigate these challenges, leadership must use a data- and analytics-driven centralization strategy and a data and analytics system that can measure performance at the surgeon, facility, and program levels.

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David Grauer, MBA, MHSA

Communication in Healthcare Culture: Eight Steps to Uphold Outcomes Improvement

Healthcare leaders looking to establish and sustain a culture of large-scale outcomes improvement must communicate their health system’s values, beliefs, and norms throughout the entire organization. Effective communication spreads understanding of outcomes improvement, ensuring broad engagement and ongoing progress toward shared goals.
An eight-step strategy describes essential elements of organizational outcomes improvement communication plan:

Include a communications specialist on the outcomes improvement leadership team.
 Analyze the stakeholders early and often.
Craft the central message around shared values.
Be a constant champion.
Commit to regular times and mechanisms for communication.
Make sure communication flows both ways.
Be transparent.
Be creative.

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David Grauer, MBA, MHSA
Tom Burton

Outcomes Improvement Governance: A Handbook for Success and Achieving More with Less

For healthcare organizations looking to achieve outcomes improvement goals, effective governance is the most essential must-have. This leadership culture ensures success by enabling health systems to invest in outcomes improvement and allocate resources appropriately toward these goals.
This executive report is an outcomes improvement governance handbook centered on four guiding principles (and associated helpful steps) health systems can follow to achieve effective governance and start achieving more with less:

Stakeholder engagement
Shared understanding
Alignment
Focus

With these four principles, organizations can build a foundation of engagement and focus around the work, where they maximize strengths, and discover and address weaknesses. They establish an improvement methodology, define their goals, and sustain and standardize improvement work.

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